Integral Lens - trip statistics:

- 9,600 miles flying

- 4,200 miles driving

- 1,300 miles public commuting

- 750,000 steps walking

- 12,000 still images taken

- 65,000 images in timelapse video, 20 min. of edited video

- 150 buildings and locations from 12 cities

- 20 meetings and interviews with related professionals

- 142 days on the road (October 19, 2015 - March 6, 2016)

Integral Lens - list of buildings visited:

1. Brooklyn Botanic Garden Visitor Center, NY, Weiss / Manfredi 

2. Whitney Museum of American Art, NY, Renzo Piano Building Workshop

3. Fulton Center, NY, Grimshaw Architects

4. West Concourse, PATH Station, NY, Santiago Calatrava

5. The Morgan Library and Museum extension, New York, by Renzo Piano Building Workshop.

6. The New Museum of Contemporary Art, New York, by SANAA.

7. Pier 15, New York, by SHoP Architects and Ken Smith.

8. Hunter’s Point South Waterfront Park, New York, by Weiss/Manfredi.

9. 9/11 Memorial and Museum, New York, by Micahel Arad, Peter Walker, Davis Brody Bond, and Snohetta. 

10. High Line public park, New York, James Corner Field Operations, with Diller Scofidio + Renfro, and Piet Oudolf.  

11. InterActiveCorp’s Head Quarters, NY, Frank Gehry 

12. Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, NY, Frank Lloyd Wright 

13. Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, NY

14. Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center at Lincoln Center, NY, David Rockwell.   

15. The Julliard School, NY, Diller Scofidio + Renfro with FX Fowle  

16. 41 Cooper Square, NY, Morphosis / Thom Mayne  

17. The Catholic Center at NYU, Machado Silvetti Architects. 

18. The Pavilion at Brookfield Place, NY, Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects. 

19. Zuccotti park, NY, Cooper Roberston. 

20. Community Rowing Boathouse, Boston, Anmahian Winton Architects

21. The new MIT Media Lab expansion, Cambridge, Fumihiko Maki. 

22. Museum of Fine Arts Boston, Art of the Americas Extension, Foster & Partners. 

23. Museum of Fine Arts Boston, Contemporary Art Extension, I.M. Pei

24. Harvard Art Museums renovation and expansion, Cambridge, Renzo Piano Building Workshop.

25. The Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston, Diller + Scofidio + Renfro. 

26. JFK Library and Museum, Boston, I.M. Pei.

27. Ray and Maria Stata Center, MIT, Cambridge, Frank Gehry.

28. Isabelle Stewart Gardner Museum, Boston, Renzo Piano Building Workshop.

29. MIT Chapel, Cambridge, Eero Saarinen 

30. Chicago Architecture Biennial Exhibition 2015, Chicago Cultural Center.  

31. Joe and Rika Mansueto Library, University of Chicago, Murphy Jahn Architects 

32. McCormick Tribune Campus Center, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, OMA / Rem Koolhaas 

33. State Street Village, IIT Dormitory, Chicago, Helmut Jahn, Murphy-Jahn Associates. 

34. Lakefront Kiosk, Chicago Architecture Biennial, Ultramoderne. 

35. Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, Josef Paul Kleihues. 

36. Reva and David Logan Center for the Arts, Chicago, Tod Williams and Billie Tsien. 

37. WMS Boathouse, Clark Park Chicago, Studio Gang Architects

38. Oak Park Public Library, Chicago, Nagle Hartray Architects.

39. The Art Institute of Chicago, Modern Wing extension, Renzo Piano Building Workshop. 

40. Millennium park plaza, Chicago. 

41. S. R. Crown Hall, IIT, Chicago, Mies van der Rohe. 

42. Bloomingdale line (trail and park), Chicago. 

43. James Thompson Center, Chicago, Helmut Jahn.

44. Frank Lloyd Wright Home and studio, Chicago.  

45. California Science Center, Los Angeles. 

46. The Broad Museum, Los Angeles, Diller Scofidio + Renfro 

47. Walt Disney Concert Hall, Los Angeles, Frank Gehry. 

48. Getty Center, Los Angeles, Richard Meier. 

49. Santa Barbara Vedanta Temple, Lutah Maria Riggs. 

50. Malibu Hindu Temple, Los Angeles. 

51. Monterey Bay Aquarium, EHDD. 

52. Red Rock Canyon Visitor Center, Nevada, Line and Space Architects. 

53. California Academy of Science, San Francisco, Renzo Piano Building Workshop.

54. De Young Fine Arts Museum, San Francisco, Herzog & de Meuron. 

55. Contemporary Jewish Museum, San Francisco, Daniel Libeskind

56. Stanford Department of Art & Art History, Stanford, Diller Scofidio + Renfro.

57. Stanford James H. Clark Center, Foster and Partners in collaboration with MBT Architecture.  

58. B Cellars Winery, Napa Valley. 

59. Domaine Chandon, Napa Valley.

60. Seattle Public Library, OMA / Rem Koolhaas

61. Experience Music Project Museum, Seattle, Frank Gehry

62. Olympic Sculpture Park, Seattle, Weiss Manfredi.   

63. Seattle Center. 

64. Museum of History & Industry, Seattle. 

65. University of Washington campus, Seattle.  

66. Clyfford Still Museum, Denver, Allied Works Architecture

67. Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Adjaye Associates

68. Denver Art Museum extension, Daniel Libeskind 

69. Denver Union Station, SOM (Skidmore, Owings & Merrill)

70. Denver Performing Arts Complex

71. University of Denver Campus

72. Cadet Chapel, U.S. Air Force Academy, Colorado Springs, Walter Netsch, Harold Wagoner, SOM

73. 1111 Lincoln Road Parking, Miami Beach, Herzog & de Meuron

74. Perez Art Museum, Miami, Herzog & de Meuron

75. New World Symphony, Miami Beach, Frank Gehry

76. Faena Arts Center, Miami Beach, OMA / Rem Koolhaas

77. The National WWII Museum, New Orleans, Voorsanger Mathes LLC

78. Ogden Museum of Southern Art, Stephen Goldring Hall, New Orleans, Errol Barron / Michael Toups.

79. Contemporary Arts Center, New Orleans, Studio WTA 

80. University of Tennessee, Knoxville Campus

Integral Lens - list of architects, photographers and artists met/contacted:

1. Mark DeKay, architect, prof. of architecture at the University of Tennessee, and expert on Integral Sustainable Design.

http://archdesign.utk.edu/faculty-staff/facultystaff/mark-dekay/

https://utk.academia.edu/MarkDeKay

2. Diane Fox, photographer, graphic designer, senior lecturer at the University of Tennessee.

http://dianefoxphotography.com

3. Hansjörg Göritz, architect, designer, prof. of architecture at the University of Tennessee. 

http://www.hansjoerggoeritz.com

4. John Kosmopoulos, behavioral scientist and fine art photographer. 

http://www.silverzenphotography.com

5. Michael Massaia, fine art photographer and printmaker.

http://michaelmassaia.com

6. Erica Stoller, director of Esto Photographics.

http://www.esto.com

7. Jade Doskow, photographer and teacher at the School of Visual Arts NYC.

http://www.jadedoskowphotography.com

8. Miranda Loud, musician, photographer and founder/director of Nature Stage NPO. 

http://www.mirandaloudphotography.com

9. Thibault Roland, fine art photographer, Boston.

http://www.thibaultroland.com

10. Angie McMonigal, fine art photographer, Chicago.

http://www.angiemcmonigal.com

11. Lisa Norton, prof. of architecture at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. 

http://www.lisanorton.org 

12. Julius Shulman Institute, Los Angeles.

http://jsi.architecture.woodbury.edu

13. Nathan Wirth, fine art photographer, San Francisco. 

http://www.nlwirth.com

14. Tim Griffith, architectural and fine art photographer, San Francisco.

http://www.timgriffith.com

15. Mohsen Ghoreishi, architect, San Francisco. 

http://kohaninc.com

16. Steve Badanes, architect and prof. of architecture at the University of Washington, Seattle. 

http://www.jerseydevildesignbuild.com

17. Prof. Kimon Valavanis, Professor and Chair of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, University of Denver.

http://www.engr.du.edu/kvalavanis/

18. Ken Wilber, Integral philosopher, Denver. 

http://www.kenwilber.com

19. James Nordlie, architect, president/owner at Archiventure Group Architects, Denver. 

http://archiventure.com

20. Dennis Ramos, fine art photographer, Miami.

http://www.dennis-ramos.com

Itinerary

Knoxville: October 19 - November 3

New York: November 3 - 21

Boston: November 21 - December 3

Chicago: December 3 - 15

Los Angeles: December 15 - January 13

San Francisco: January 13 - 25

Seattle: January 25 - 31

Denver: February 1 - 13

Miami: February 13 - 19

New Orleans: February 19 - 24

Knoxville: February 24 - March 6

Integral lens: an integral approach to the study and representation of the built environment through the photographic medium. 

 

By Pygmalion Karatzas

June 10, 2015.

 

Proposed project for the 2015-2016 Fulbright Artist Scholarship Award.

 

1. Visit and photograph alternative/holistic cases of community developments and ecovillages. The photographic result will be of the photojournalistic genre. 

2. Meet and observe architects and their work, architectural photographers, and media leaders, to document the way architectural photography is being produced, presented, influenced and influencing. The photographic result will be within the editorial genre. 

3. Study and add artistic and contemplative approaches to photography about the built environment and the ‘man-altered landscape’. The photographic result will be of the fine art genre. In the theoretical level will apply Ken Wilber’s integral approach. Emphasis will also be given to photographic workshops. 

4. Experiment on the innovative applications of drone photography and photogrammetry and how these new technologies apply to architectural documentation and representation. 

 

Relation to current work: The integral theory has been studied for architecture, sustainability and art and with this project it can be put to practice by applying it to the framing of the project itself and meeting people and cases who can fill in the pieces and enrich the content. The ecovillage design education can meet the alternative community developments. The photo editor position has established a connection with fellow photographers which can be expanded and deepened. My own editorial photography can include the contemporary architecture in the US and my fine art photography can further research and contemplate on the relationships between photography and the built environment.

 

The crisis in Greece had and continues to have a major negative impact on all professions around the construction industry, a devaluation of our built environment assets, a new emerging role for grassroots communities and sustainable living, and a realization of the overal global interconnectedness.

Architecture creates cultural and economic assets for people and society at large, and a decreased growth can be confronted by a re-evalution of the existing wealth, as well as a more critical look that can at the same time be aspirational. 

 

Grassroots communities bring a rich set of skillful means on issues like conflict resolution, participatory education, socially engaged spirituality, life coaching and empowerment, ecological technologies, social enterprises, permaculture, celebrating life through art, among others. By presenting these endeavours we create a kinship traversing national/traditional boundaries.

 

All artistic movements in history have developed hand in hand with the pioneering theories of their time. An integral approach to our current needs and problems is one of the most inclusive and positive methodologies at our disposal. By studying the integral movement in the US where it originated and puting it into practice, we can pave the way for other fields to follow, and by doing so establishing a common language while respecting multiple perspectives and diversity. 

 

I am honored that the University of Tennesse, Knoxville and prof. Mark DeKay at the College of Architecture and Design will be sponsoring this project.

 

Submitted portfolio:

http://www.blurb.com/books/6008038-morphogenesis

 

Related articles:

http://www.pygmalionkaratzas.com/articleintegral1

 

http://www.pygmalionkaratzas.com/articleintegral2

 

Links:

Fulbright Fundation Greece: http://www.fulbright.gr/index_en.html

College of Architecture and Design, University of Tennesse Knoxville: http://archdesign.utk.edu

The framework of integral methodology as postulated by philosopher Ken Wilber and the Integral institute, adapted for the context of architectural photography. The four quadrants take into consideration the interior and exterior aspects of both the individual and the collective perspectives of an investigated phenomenon, in order to provide a comprehensive study that respects all available dimensions in a non-reductionist manner.